Alpine Blue campanula

Alpine Blue campanula

Campanula are staple features in English gardens and Mediterranean gardens.The one feature the many campanula species all share is the similar bloom shapes. Campanula flowers are either star of bell shaped and have five petals.

Most varieties come in shades of blue but there are a few white and pink types available. Flowers can appear singly or in clusters. Flowering times will vary depending upon the variety but most bloom the better part of the growing season.

Canterbury Bells

Canterbury Bells

Canterbury Bells

Canterbury Bells are a herbaceous perennial with a spreading habit that makes for a good groundcover plant. Its originates from the Carpathian Mountains. It likes semi-shade conditions with temperatures of around 22°C daytime, and not lower than 5°C nighttime.  It likes moist, well-drained soil; fertilize regularly for good flowering; overwatering may cause fungus (leaves turn yellow from base of plant up).

Regular deadheading (removing of spent blooms), will increase blooming of new vines and the life of plant; deadheading also aids in avoiding fungus. Plant or Seed in spring; division/cuttings spring or early summer. Take care of pests such as snails, slugs, rusts.

Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at PhotobucketCampanula punctata

Most of the campanulas mentioned above are not native to Japan. There is however the Campanula punctata, a.k.a. by its common name – Chinese Rampion or in Japanese “hotarubukuro” which IS native to Japan and East Asia.

For more information on campanula, refer to the Campanula page.

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