My laundry line

Can you see why they are also called Dutchman’s Breeches? These are strung out charmingly on a laundry line!

However, these plants are more commonly known here as the Bleeding Hearts or by the scientific name: Dicentra

Oh my Bleeding Heart

Dicentra (from the Greek words dis, meaning “two”, and kentros, meaning “spurs”) are spring blooming.

Origin: Eurasia from Siberia to Japan.

“These lovely perennials are found wild in shady hollows and forests from Siberia to Japan. Dicentras are commonly known as Bleeding Hearts. The varieties of these plants range in height from 12 to 30 inches and spread up to 18 inches or more. D. spectabilis var. alba is a clump-forming plant with light green, deeply divided leaves resembling those of the fern. Its pure white, heart-shaped flowers hang pendulous from arching stems in late spring and early summer. It is sometimes hard to distinguish this variety from the pink-flowered kinds when not in bloom, so to avoid disappointment, purchase this plant during its flowering period. D. ‘Bacchanal’ is more of a spreading plant, growing from 12 to 18 inches high. Its foliage is also fern-like and a pretty green color. The small, heart-shaped flowers of this variety also grow from arching stems in late spring and early summer; they are very dark red. D. ‘Spring Morning’ forms mounds of bright grayish-green, feathery foliage up to a foot high. Its small, heart-shaped flowers are pink.

POTTING: These plants need moist soil that is rich in humus and a position in partial shade. D. spectabilis ‘alba’ is hardy, but keep in mind that the new growth can still be damaged by severe late frosts.

PROPAGATION: The roots may be divided and repotted when they are dormant in late winter. Seeds may also be sown in a cold frame or sheltered spot outdoors in early summer or autumn. Root cuttings may be taken in the fall.

VARIETIES: D. spectabilis & var. alba; D. formosa; D.eximia; D. oregana; D. chrysantha (Golden Eardrops); D.canadensis (Squirrel’s Corn); D. Cucullaria (Dutchman’s-Breeches). ” Source: Botany.com

 

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